Minister’s Musing

January 2021

Happy New Year. The end of the year comes with an array of traditions and rituals meant to get the year off to a good start. In my family, the last day of the year is spent finishing a deep clean of the home—including laundry and taking out the trash—so as not to bring last year’s dirt and waste into the next year. And New Year’s Day requires the traditional New Year’s meal of collard greens, black eyed peas, and fish—all for luck and prosperity. Whatever your traditions, the New Year offers an opportunity to engage in some rituals to help us transition; it is an apt time for reset and renewal on a host of levels: spiritual, physical, emotional, interpersonal, or professional.

My New Year’s rituals include some time for reflection, meditation and journaling. I don’t do resolutions, but I do use the time to consider what I have learned from the past year, where I have been successful, and where I have fallen short in the past year. With reflection, I use this time to set some intentions for the coming year. In the final worship service of 2020, we asked ourselves:

  • How has this year been hard or challenging for you?
  • What are you celebrating this year?
  • What are you letting go of from this year?
  • What are you inviting into your life? What are you looking forward to in the coming year?

Some additional questions that I am reflecting on this year are:

  • What do I want to accomplish this year?
  • What do I want to transform?
  • What do I want to bring into my life?
  • What five things are bringing you joy

For your own reflection, think about the questions that help you to focus on your own life priorities.

This year, I will be repeating my newest year-end ritual: A focus word for the year ahead. The idea is to choose a word that I return to all year—for inspiration, guidance, reflection, or meditation. There are different ways to settle on your word. Some choose a word based on deep reflection described above. I prefer to select my focus word randomly from a list of focus words. You can find some examples here, here and here. The challenge is finding ways to return to your word during the year. You might include your focus word as part of a regular (daily, weekly, monthly) meditation or journaling session. You may put the word in a prominent place that you see every day, such as your bathroom mirror, your computer, or your day planner. Consider how you see your focus word turning up in your relationships, your work, or your spiritual life.

However you choose to mark the turning of the year, may this be a time of deeper connection to yourself and to the world around you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONTACT

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Unitarian Universalist Congregation
of the South Fork

977 Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike
P.O. Box 1444
Bridgehampton, NY 11932
631-537-0132

Rev. Kimberly Quinn Johnson 
minister@uucsf.org

We love to share our congregational happenings and answer any question you may have about us.  Please fill out the form below to be added to our email list. Or, feel free to leave a more detailed question and we will respond

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